Archive for the ‘ project planning ’ Category

>Focusing and streamlining my concepts into 5 steps or tiers

>I have apparently so many ideas that they can not be incorporated in one aircraft. Therefore I have concluded that there needs to be several steps or tiers with a slightly different themes.

So these are now:
Tier 1: Conventional simplicity: Low drag low power low cost twin. Small wing but high aspect ratio. Compromise: Medium power to weight ratio required. Concept usable for personal aviation.
Potential outcomes: RC-models, UAVs, Private aircraft.
Budget: Shoe-string

Tier 2: Flying wing: Suitable for diesel power, series hybrid and other non-optimal power/weight ratio powerplants. Large wing. Compromise: Poor power to weight ratio is ok.
Potential outcome: Plane with long range and diesel economy. UAV applications possible.
Budget: Shoe-string, external funding possibly needed for the large craft

Tier 3: Ladder: Large aspect ratio, climb machine. Compromise: High power to weight ratio beneficial, has impact in fuel consumption. Interference drag from multi-fuselage configuration.
Budget: External funding required. Implementation requires substantial investments in infrastructure and machinery.

Tier 4: Scissor wing delta: Aircraft that are optimized for speed and altitude.
Budget: Requires substantial investments.

Tier 5: Will happen only if tier 1-4 succeed. Idea not announced. Not all of these will be guaranteed to produce real flying aircraft, these are just categorization for a family of concepts.

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6 milestones plan for getting things done

I have been thinking the ways to achieve a design and implementation of a dream aircraft, and have concluded that it has to go in more than one step, so I was thinking the following milestones:

1. Unpressurized version, with a single turbo and fuel injection kit per engine. Possibly with a cabin similar to seen in Orka, avoid the manufacture of the doors. Woodcomp CS propellers. Target cruise altitude = 25000-30000 ft with supplemental oxygen. Corners cut where necessary to just get it done. No active boundary layer control, no wing tip propellers etc., rely on natural laminar flow to achieve efficiency. Unstable release of plans, calculations etc. Version A.
2. Open source plans stable release for the version A (CNC code, 3D models, 2D drawings, construction plans, layup schedules). Flight testing gives the final specifications for version B and ideas what to change to version B. Version A prototype is in use.
3. Optimized version of the above, version B. Modifications to version A prototype, version A becomes version B.
4. Stable release of version B plans (CNC code, 3D models, 2D drawings, construction plans, layup schedules). Version B might be alternative for a basis of a kit.
5. Pressurized version with doors, twin turbos per engine, intercooler and aftercooler per engine, computer controlled waste gates, and hybrid turbo compounding with two electric motors where one is functioning as generator and the the other runs the compounding. Possibly longer wings for high altitude flight. MT propeller or other higher end propellers. Possibly aerodynamic design changes, based on issues found in versions A and B and other improvements. Version C.
6. Open source plans stable release for the version C (CNC code, 3D models, 2D drawings, construction plans, layup schedules). Version C is a completely new aircraft and thus version B and version C coexists.

There are at least two milestones before 1.
-1 = concepting and collecting information, and creating needed softwares (present)
0 = initial concepting freezes, and version control repository (e.g. svn) exists for all data and there is a web page for the project.

>6 milestones plan for getting things done

>I have been thinking the ways to achieve a design and implementation of a dream aircraft, and have concluded that it has to go in more than one step, so I was thinking the following milestones:

1. Unpressurized version, with a single turbo and fuel injection kit per engine. Possibly with a cabin similar to seen in Orka, avoid the manufacture of the doors. Woodcomp CS propellers. Target cruise altitude = 25000-30000 ft with supplemental oxygen. Corners cut where necessary to just get it done. No active boundary layer control, no wing tip propellers etc., rely on natural laminar flow to achieve efficiency. Unstable release of plans, calculations etc. Version A.
2. Open source plans stable release for the version A (CNC code, 3D models, 2D drawings, construction plans, layup schedules). Flight testing gives the final specifications for version B and ideas what to change to version B. Version A prototype is in use.
3. Optimized version of the above, version B. Modifications to version A prototype, version A becomes version B.
4. Stable release of version B plans (CNC code, 3D models, 2D drawings, construction plans, layup schedules). Version B might be alternative for a basis of a kit.
5. Pressurized version with doors, twin turbos per engine, intercooler and aftercooler per engine, computer controlled waste gates, and hybrid turbo compounding with two electric motors where one is functioning as generator and the the other runs the compounding. Possibly longer wings for high altitude flight. MT propeller or other higher end propellers. Possibly aerodynamic design changes, based on issues found in versions A and B and other improvements. Version C.
6. Open source plans stable release for the version C (CNC code, 3D models, 2D drawings, construction plans, layup schedules). Version C is a completely new aircraft and thus version B and version C coexists.

There are at least two milestones before 1.
-1 = concepting and collecting information, and creating needed softwares (present)
0 = initial concepting freezes, and version control repository (e.g. svn) exists for all data and there is a web page for the project.