Archive for the ‘ aircraft design ’ Category

Video: Dr. Pete Gall: Designing Light Aircraft. Airventure 2011.

I recorded Dr. Pete Gall’s presentation at Oshkosh 2011 about Designing Light Aircraft. This presentation explains with a case example of Beech Bonanza how the wing affects the drag of the whole aircraft. In the presentation a new more efficient wing is designed for the Bonanza and the results are compared to the original aircraft. This presentation is rather interesting and worth to watch. Pete Gall’s merit list is rather long (see the end titles from the video). Here is the link to the event recording I made: YouTube: Dr. Pete Gall: Designing Light Aircraft. Oshkosh Airventure 2011

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>6 milestones plan for getting things done

>I have been thinking the ways to achieve a design and implementation of a dream aircraft, and have concluded that it has to go in more than one step, so I was thinking the following milestones:

1. Unpressurized version, with a single turbo and fuel injection kit per engine. Possibly with a cabin similar to seen in Orka, avoid the manufacture of the doors. Woodcomp CS propellers. Target cruise altitude = 25000-30000 ft with supplemental oxygen. Corners cut where necessary to just get it done. No active boundary layer control, no wing tip propellers etc., rely on natural laminar flow to achieve efficiency. Unstable release of plans, calculations etc. Version A.
2. Open source plans stable release for the version A (CNC code, 3D models, 2D drawings, construction plans, layup schedules). Flight testing gives the final specifications for version B and ideas what to change to version B. Version A prototype is in use.
3. Optimized version of the above, version B. Modifications to version A prototype, version A becomes version B.
4. Stable release of version B plans (CNC code, 3D models, 2D drawings, construction plans, layup schedules). Version B might be alternative for a basis of a kit.
5. Pressurized version with doors, twin turbos per engine, intercooler and aftercooler per engine, computer controlled waste gates, and hybrid turbo compounding with two electric motors where one is functioning as generator and the the other runs the compounding. Possibly longer wings for high altitude flight. MT propeller or other higher end propellers. Possibly aerodynamic design changes, based on issues found in versions A and B and other improvements. Version C.
6. Open source plans stable release for the version C (CNC code, 3D models, 2D drawings, construction plans, layup schedules). Version C is a completely new aircraft and thus version B and version C coexists.

There are at least two milestones before 1.
-1 = concepting and collecting information, and creating needed softwares (present)
0 = initial concepting freezes, and version control repository (e.g. svn) exists for all data and there is a web page for the project.

6 milestones plan for getting things done

I have been thinking the ways to achieve a design and implementation of a dream aircraft, and have concluded that it has to go in more than one step, so I was thinking the following milestones:

1. Unpressurized version, with a single turbo and fuel injection kit per engine. Possibly with a cabin similar to seen in Orka, avoid the manufacture of the doors. Woodcomp CS propellers. Target cruise altitude = 25000-30000 ft with supplemental oxygen. Corners cut where necessary to just get it done. No active boundary layer control, no wing tip propellers etc., rely on natural laminar flow to achieve efficiency. Unstable release of plans, calculations etc. Version A.
2. Open source plans stable release for the version A (CNC code, 3D models, 2D drawings, construction plans, layup schedules). Flight testing gives the final specifications for version B and ideas what to change to version B. Version A prototype is in use.
3. Optimized version of the above, version B. Modifications to version A prototype, version A becomes version B.
4. Stable release of version B plans (CNC code, 3D models, 2D drawings, construction plans, layup schedules). Version B might be alternative for a basis of a kit.
5. Pressurized version with doors, twin turbos per engine, intercooler and aftercooler per engine, computer controlled waste gates, and hybrid turbo compounding with two electric motors where one is functioning as generator and the the other runs the compounding. Possibly longer wings for high altitude flight. MT propeller or other higher end propellers. Possibly aerodynamic design changes, based on issues found in versions A and B and other improvements. Version C.
6. Open source plans stable release for the version C (CNC code, 3D models, 2D drawings, construction plans, layup schedules). Version C is a completely new aircraft and thus version B and version C coexists.

There are at least two milestones before 1.
-1 = concepting and collecting information, and creating needed softwares (present)
0 = initial concepting freezes, and version control repository (e.g. svn) exists for all data and there is a web page for the project.

>Eggenfellner’s aircraft project

>Eggenfellner seems to be building a new aircraft type:

http://www.eggenfellneraircraft.com/E2B.htm

Interesting design choice – flying wing, no tail. Sounds like no flaps on this machine for increasing Clmax.

Eggenfellner’s aircraft project

Eggenfellner seems to be building a new aircraft type:

http://www.eggenfellneraircraft.com/E2B.htm

Interesting design choice – flying wing, no tail. Sounds like no flaps on this machine for increasing Clmax.

Eggenfellner’s aircraft project

Eggenfellner seems to be building a new aircraft type:

http://www.eggenfellneraircraft.com/E2B.htm

Interesting design choice – flying wing, no tail. Sounds like no flaps on this machine for increasing Clmax.

Eggenfellner’s aircraft project

Eggenfellner seems to be building a new aircraft type:

http://www.eggenfellneraircraft.com/E2B.htm

Interesting design choice – flying wing, no tail. Sounds like no flaps on this machine for increasing Clmax.