NACA 66-020, 66-025, 66-030 body drag coefficient

Some numbers from Javafoil using the Drela approximation method (Xfoil after 1991):


NACA 66-020

Parameters: Length 6 meters, diameter from thickest point 1.2 meters:

α Re Cl Cd Cm 0.25 TU TL SU SL L/D A.C.
[°] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-]
0.0 11.60E6 0.000 0.00709 -0.000 0.623 0.623 1.000 1.000 0.000 0.380

So estimated Cd for the fuselage is 0.00709. Doors, antennas, landing gear door, etc. will make it worse.

Bugs and dirt on the fuselage surface and the results becomes:

NACA 66-020

α Re Cl Cd Cm 0.25 TU TL SU SL L/D A.C.
[°] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-]
0.0 11.60E6 0.000 0.01212 -0.000 0.625 0.625 1.000 1.000 0.000 0.380

NACA 66-030 (engine nacelle variant of the laminar body)

m/S = 1
α Re Cl Cd Cm 0.25 TU TL SU SL L/D A.C.
[°] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-]
0.0 11.60E6 0.000 0.00775 -0.000 0.605 0.603 1.000 1.000 0.000 0.456

Cd = 0.00775

With NACA 66-025 the fuselage pod length drops to 4.8 meters.

NACA 66-025

m/S = 1
α Re Cl Cd Cm 0.25 TU TL SU SL L/D A.C.
[°] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-] [-]
0.0 9.28E6 0.000 0.00812 -0.000 0.612 0.612 1.000 1.000 0.000 0.417

Cd = 0.00818

Conclusion: All of these pods provide (according to simulation), a low drag coefficient.

Equivalent drag area for NACA 66-025 assuming body diameter of 1.2 meters:

0.00818*(0.6m*0.6m*3.14159) = 0.00925 m^2 (=0.0823 sq ft)

Hmm. did I calculate correctly? Somehow looks quite small.

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